Clinical Practice in Pediatrics

Ratio of early to late mortality among viable neonates as a marker of medical and social efficiency of mother and child health care in the Republic of Crimea and Russian Federation

We compared medical and social effectiveness of mother and child health care in the Russian Federation (RF) and Republic of Crimea (RC) in 2015–2017 by calculating the integral coefficient proposed by WHO for assessing the effectiveness of this service. This coefficient was calculated as the ratio of late (postneonatal) and early (stillbirth and neonatal) mortality of viable neonates using the formula K=L/E. The activity of the maternity and child protection service was characterized by very high medical and social efficiency both in the RC (0.25 in 2015 – 0.23 in 2017) and in the RF (0.28 in 2015 – 0.27 in 2017), which reflects low postneonatal mortality rates (2017 – 2.4‰ in both RC and RF). Two other coefficients (stillbirth and neonatal mortality), forming E component in the WHO formula differed between RF and RC. By 2017, stillbirth rate in the RC remained higher than that in the RF (7.4‰ vs 5.6‰), where a positive trend was observed (a 5.4% decrease by 2017). The neonatal
mortality rate in the RC was traditionally lower than that in the RF (3.6‰ in 2015 and 2.9‰ in 2017 vs 3.8‰ in 2015 and 3.2‰ in 2017 г). Very high effectiveness of the maternal and child protection service (as demonstrated by the ratio of early to late mortality among viable neonates) reflects effective antenatal and postnatal prophylaxis performed in both RC and RF during a long period of time.
Key words: ratio of early to late mortality in viable neonates, medical and social efficiency, stillbirth rate, neonatal mortality, postneonatal mortality, mother and child health care, Republic of Crimea, Russian Federation.

For citation: Tretyakova O.S., Gaffarova A.S. Ratio of early to late mortality among viable neonates as a marker of medical and social efficiency of mother and child health care in the Republic of Crimea and Russian Federation. Vopr. prakt. pediatr. (Clinical Practice in Pediatrics). 2019; 14(4): 120–124. (In Russian).

DOI: 10.20953/1817-7646-2019-4-120-124

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