Clinical Practice in Pediatrics

Atopic dermatitis: pathogenetic mechanisms, skin barrier function, commensal bacteria and Staphylococcus aureus

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease whose development is usually accompanied by innate and acquired immunity disorders. Recently, there has been a significant amount of professional interest in assessing skin barrier consistency, skin microbiome features and the functional activity of immune protection factors. The investigators of AD pathogenesis have shifted focus to learning specific signal ways involved in producing local inflammatory responses along with
Th2/Th1-lymphocytes and Th17/Th22-lymphocytes in acute and chronic illness. The detected skin barrier anomaly, its defense failure, lesser production of commensal bacteria promote skin lesion colonization by opportunistic flora. As of today, there have been published enough papers proving the negative role of the strains of staphylococcus aureus in intensifying local inflammatory responses in AD. A better understanding of the possible pathogenetic mechanisms of the disease will contribute to working out more effective AD treatment techniques.
Key words: atopic dermatitis, staphylococcus aureus, immunity, microbiome, skin.

For citation: Kudryavtseva A.V., Gelezhe K.A., Farber I.M. Atopic dermatitis: pathogenetic mechanisms, skin barrier function, commensal bacteria and Staphylococcus aureus. Vopr. prakt. pediatr. (Clinical Practice in Pediatrics). 2019; 14(4): 51–57. (In Russian).
DOI: 10.20953/1817-7646-2019-4-51-57

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